About OBC

New High-Tech Anti-Goose System

If you’ve been rowing lately, you may have noticed two new developments on the main dock: a long jug-and-string contraption and an absence of goose mess.

For some years dock users have relied on the park’s early-morning sprinkler system to wash goose leavings off the dock. Unfortunately that system has deteriorated, and it suffers from lack of maintenance. For the last year or so the sprinklers have become ineffectual, and dock users have come to depend on the kind souls who laboriously sweep the dock clean every day or two.

Taking a cue from those who use the second dock, Bob Spousta decided to pilot a simple jug-and-string system on the main dock. The string, which runs just a few inches above dock level around its perimeter, discourages geese from climbing up on the dock.

And…the new system is working: on a recent morning, for example, the first rowers to launch found the jugs in place and the dock 100% mess free. The flock of geese that typically roams Sandy Run seemed to have congregated on a sandy shore about 50 yards upstream.

While docks are in use, the jugs can simply be moved to the middle of the dock. The last person to use the docks in the evening should move them back out to the edges, making sure the string is taut (in the air) rather than lying on the dock. Resetting the loop in the evening is obviously key to the system’s continued success.

Robin Quinn is interested in knowing how the system is working: If you’re the first one to the docks in the morning, and you see that the loop hasn’t been reset, please email her at gro.cbowornull@tnediserp.

It’s probable that a separate loop will be devised for the ramp. When this loop is introduced, it will need to be removed entirely during the day rather than simply moved to the center of the ramp.

Bob is continuing to tweak the system to make it more user friendly. If you have suggestions, contact him at ude.umgnull@atsuopsr. In the meantime, enjoy the clean surface!